Spotlight

Founded in 1927, Temple Law Review is a student-edited, quarterly journal dedicated to providing a forum for the expression of new legal thought and scholarly commentary on important developments, trends, and issues in the law. 

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Haesun Burris Lee

This Comment concludes by arguing that in order to extend adequate protections to potential homeowners with limited access to credit—but not dismiss creative forms of investment or stifle the individual right to freely enter into contracts—courts must recognize the inherent unconscionability of most contracts for deed of sale. Further, state legislatures should treat these contracts […]

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Kaylin Hawkins

This Comment argues that the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) gives federal judges clear authority to “set aside agency action . . . [that is] arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law.” The public charge rule puts the Trump administration’s actions well within the meaning of “arbitrary and capricious” under […]

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Lucy Weisner

This Comment makes two contributions. First, it adds to the understanding of the legislative history and impact of SESTA/FOSTA. Second, it suggests an amendment to the statute that would clarify the law. In Section II, this Comment discusses the history of internet liability and the SESTA/FOSTA law in order to contextualize the statute and illuminate […]

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Courtney Kurz

This Comment aims to discuss the varying legal treatment of domestic and international terrorism and ultimately argues that this distinction is unhelpful and prohibits adequate detection, investigation, and prevention of domestic terrorism in the United States. Section II provides essential background on the federal criminal and civil laws involving both domestic and international terrorism, details […]

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Michael D. Cicchini

In light of these and other problems, this Article advocates for simple legal reform: the abolition of arbitrary plea deadlines or, in the alternative, severe constraints on the trial judge’s power to impose them. The legal system, however, is often resistant to change. Therefore, this Article makes a more immediate and useful contribution: it provides […]

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Edward J. Imwinkelried

In the past fifteen years, several prestigious organizations have called for reforms to improve the reliability of prosecution forensic evidence. One way that the courts could incentivize such reform is by liberally admitting defense expert testimony that rebuts the prosecution evidence. However, one comment recently argued that the courts admit defense rebuttal testimony more restrictively […]

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Byron G. Stier

Temple University School of Law offered the Abraham L. Freedman Fellowship Program for four decades beginning in the 1970s, assisting to establish post-J.D. teaching fellowships as a well-recognized path into legal academia. Over the two-year fellowship, Freedman Fellows taught multiple legal writing courses and one doctrinal course, collaborated with faculty teaching doctrinal courses, attended faculty meetings, and received guidance in […]

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Rachel Arnow-Richman

A fundamental obstacle to the success of legal education’s practice-readiness movement is the “bifurcated faculty.” Most law schools continue to operate a two-tiered system in which a group of elite-credentialed “doctrinal” faculty enjoy the generous compensation, security, and privileges associated with tenure, while an underclass of contract faculty teach work-intensive “skills” courses for lower pay and lesser status. This Essay […]

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Cody J. Jacobs

The hiring market for tenure-track non–legal writing positions is a world unto itself with its own lingo (i.e., “meat market” and “FAR form”), its own unwritten rules (i.e., “Do not have two first-year courses in your preferred teaching package.”), and carefully calibrated expectations for candidates and schools with respect to the process and timing of hiring. These norms and […]

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Deseriee A. Kennedy

Lawyers do not reflect the racial diversity in the United States. The legal profession continues to struggle with ways to achieve and maintain racial diversity. Law schools play a critical role in the path to practice, and therefore an examination of the barriers to the profession they create is warranted. This Essay critiques the overreliance on standardized testing in […]