Spotlight

Founded in 1927, Temple Law Review is a student-edited, quarterly journal dedicated to providing a forum for the expression of new legal thought and scholarly commentary on important developments, trends, and issues in the law. 

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Christopher P. Guzelian & Jeff Todd

Despite its laudable goals, sustainable development has been criticized for its discursive aspects. These include that the vagueness of the term combined with the lack of embodiment in law allow numerous private governance standards to support almost any company or project as “sustainable”; that the positive of bringing numerous stakeholders with divergent interests together becomes […]

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Esteban Rodriguez

Renting an apartment can, in some ways, be like buying a gallon of milk. Imagine you are in a supermarket dairy aisle. Being a prudent consumer, you might check the expiration date on the container. Even the savviest shopper, however, would not think to chemically analyze the product to ensure that what they are purchasing […]

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Elizabeth Wetzler

Consider for a moment the life of a piece of trash. It may be a water bottle or a paper towel or a banana peel, but regardless of its identity, it goes somewhere after it has been thrown into a trashcan. The question is, where? Depending on its material composition, it may be recycled or […]

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Jacqueline Winton

For the average American consumer, a chocolate bar is simply a sweet treat. This sweet treat is incredibly popular; the United States confectionery industry generates over $37 billion in sales each year. However, the sad truth is that the majority of America’s popular candy, and many other frequently consumed food products, are created in supply […]

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Usha R. Rodrigues

This Article confronts the question of optimal whistleblowing in the context of financial fraud. Design choices, which play out along two axes, have profound effects on the successful implementation of whistleblowing policy. One axis varies by end goal—to provide whistleblowers with positive monetary incentives or to make them whole with antiretaliation protection. The other axis […]

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Sarah Zimmerman

The Supreme Court has expressly held that there is no fundamental right to education. Indeed, in contrast with almost every other nation on Earth, the United States Constitution does not mention the word “education” at all. While the constitutions of all fifty states guarantee access to some level of public education, the federal judiciary has […]

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Allan Carlsen

The issue of patentable subject matter has made a dramatic resurgence in patent litigation within the past decade. The analysis of whether certain subject matter is patent eligible is governed by 35 U.S.C. § 101. Section 101 carries with it the judicial constructions of patent eligibility that had evolved over the course of 160 years […]

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Anna Johnson

A company’s trademark can be its single greatest source of “intangible value.” From 2010 to 2019, over 38.7 million trademark applications were filed worldwide. The Coca-Cola Company expressed its first trademark in 18873 and owns trademarks to “Coca-Cola,” to the graphic representation of its name, and to its bottle shape. Trademarks serve two functions: (1) […]

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Clinton G. Wallace, Jeffrey M. Blaylock

This Article queries how the administrative tax guidance used to implement the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 has met the normative commitment to democratic legitimacy that often animates general administrative law. This Article argues that several reforms to the tax administrative process that came to fruition in recent years have failed to advance […]

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James T. Smith

“Every day I’m trying to play catch-up,” said Kourtney McGowan—a Black mother from California who became unemployed after her company refused to accommodate her work schedule during the COVID-19 pandemic. McGowan noted that she could not “have [her] son in [her] office for eight hours every day,” and she had no reliable plan for childcare. […]